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Gastroenterology at Saint Vincent Hospital

Digestive Diseases of Northwestern Pennsylvania

 
Saint Vincent brings the nation's experts to you, providing the quality of care and expertise that your patients need, closer to home.  The physicians of Digestive Diseases specialize in the following procedures at Saint Vincent.
 
  • Colonoscopy
  • Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (EGD)
  • Esophageal variceal banding
  • Esophageal stenting
  • Video capsule endoscopy
  • Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram
  • Radio frequency ablation of Carrett's esophagus
  • Push enteroscopy
  • Capsule endoscopy
  • Polypectomy
  • Placement of colonic stents
  • Clipping and injecting of bleeding peptic ulcers
  • ERCP with removal of stones from common bile duct
  • ERCP with management of strictures and placement of CBD stents
  • PEG tube placement
  • Flexible sigmoidscopy
  • Hemorrhoidal banding
 
For questions or to make an appointment, please contact:
Digestive Diseases of Northwestern Pennsylvania
2315 Myrtle Street, Suite 290
Erie, PA  16502
814.452.2767

 

 

Saint Vincent Endoscopy Center

 

The Saint Vincent Endoscopy Center is an outpatient facility that offers the same endoscopic services and high-quality care provided in the hospital, but in an off-campus, patient-friendly, comfortable setting. In this reassuring environment, you will receive individual attention from a caring and highly skilled staff of doctors and nurses, and return home the same day. Patients must bring an escort and should plan to be at the Center for approximately two hours from check-in to discharge. A comfortable waiting room is available for patients’ family and friends.

Procedures Performed at the Endoscopy Center
Endoscopy is a minimally invasive diagnostic medical procedure used to elevate the interior surfaces of an organ. Many endoscopic procedures are relatively painless and only associated with mild discomfort, though patients are sedated for most procedures. At the Saint Vincent Endoscopy Center, we specialize in procedures of the gastrointestinal tract, including:

  • Esophagus, stomach and duodenum (upper endoscopy, esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD)
  • Colon (lower endoscopy or colonoscopy)
  • Sigmoid colon (flexible sigmoidoscopy or flex sig)

Patients can schedule a procedure at the Saint Vincent Endoscopy Center through their primary care physician (PCP). The PCP must refer to one of the Center's practicing physicians, who will evaluate the patient and then schedule him/her for a procedure at the Center. For more information call 814-833-0071.

Saint Vincent Endoscopy Center Hours & Location


Saint Vincent Endoscopy Center   
2501 West 12 Street, Suite 8
Erie, PA 16505
814-833-0071

Hours
Monday - Friday, 7 a.m to 4 p.m.
Saturday - Sunday, closed

Meet the Experts

The following physicians perform procedures at the Saint Vincent Endoscopy Center.
 

Segun E. Abogunde, MD

Vladislava Buntic, MD

Daniele Haupt, MD

Dinesh C. Khera, MD

Patrick J. Recio, DO

Procedure Overview

Procedure Overview

A nurse from the Endoscopy Center will call you the day before your procedure to verify the appointment time and answer any questions. The time given by the nurse is the official arrival time for your procedure. Please notify the Endoscopy Center at 814-833-0071 prior to preparing for the procedure if you answer “yes” to any of the following questions. There may be a possibility that the procedure cannot be done at the Center.     

  • Have you had a heart attack or stroke within the last three months?  (myocardial infarction, TIA or CIA)   
  • Are you currently on medication for an irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia) or chest pain taking nitroglycerin?    
  • Do you see a heart doctor (cardiologist) on a regular basis, for example: weekly, monthly or every six months?    
  • Do you have a pacemaker or defibrillator implanted in your body? (Patients with a pacemaker defibrillator cannot have the procedure at the Center.)    
  • Do you weigh 350 pounds or more?    
  • Do you have trouble breathing when you take two flights of stairs?    
  • Do you have oxygen at home in case you need it?    
  • Are you on dialysis? (You have a shunt in your arm and you go for treatments on a regular basis.)    
  • Have you been hospitalized for any illness or major surgery involving your heart, lungs, kidney or head within the past three months?    
  • Are you seeing a physician for any problems with your blood or blood count?    
  • Have you or any family members been told that you had problems with your anesthesia when put asleep for a surgery or procedure?

Prior to Your Procedure

  • Complete and be prepared to review a patient questionnaire the day prior to your procedure. A nurse will call with your procedure time. You must also bring this completed form with you on the day of your procedure.
  • Leave all jewelry and valuables at home. This does not mean your insurance card or your eyeglasses.  The Endoscopy Center cannot take responsibility for safeguarding your personal items. 
  • Make arrangements for someone to drive you home. Your escort must remain onsite, be available to hear the discharge instructions and drive you home.  A pharmacy with snacks and beverages is located in the building as well as vending machines.  Please limit the number of persons accompanying you to a maximum of two. Only one person will be allowed in the recovery room with you.
  • Please make arrangements for childcare in advance. The Endoscopy Center reception area and recovery room area are not designed to accommodate small children.
  • If you have any questions regarding your medication prior to the procedure, please contact your physician’s office.

 

Day of Your Procedure

  • Please check in at the reception desk 45 minutes to one hour before your procedure is scheduled to begin.     
  • Bring your insurance card(s) and photo identification.    
  • Bring your medication(s) or list of the medication(s) and dosages you are currently taking.
  • It is very important for us to know if you have any allergies; especially an allergy to rubber (latex).
  • If you have sleep apnea and use a C-PAP machine, please bring it with you if you are scheduled for a colonoscopy.    

 

After Your Procedure

  • Average recovery time is 30 minutes to one hour for most procedures.    
  • Your escort will need to come into the recovery room to listen to your discharge instructions, sign the written instructions and escort you home.    
  • We would prefer your driver to stay in the immediate area during your procedure.     
  • Patients will remain in the recovery area until they are ready for discharge.     
  • You may not take a bus or taxi home.
  • It would be best if someone could stay with you at home or check on you following your procedure.    

Click on the links below for additional information about specific procedures:  
                      
                        

                                                 

Colonoscopy FAQ

Colonoscopy FAQ

What is a colonoscopy?
A colonoscopy is an exam using an instrument called a colonoscope, which is a thin, lighted flexible tube. This instrument allows the physician to directly view the inside of your colon (large intestine). Photos can be taken to document findings, and tissue samples (biopsies) may be taken. This is a way for your physician to evaluate the colon in great detail.

Polyps are small growths originating in the lining of the colon. Most polyps are non-cancerous (benign), but the physician cannot always tell a benign polyp from a malignant (cancerous) polyp by its visual appearance. For this reason, all polyps found will be removed and sent to pathology for analysis. You should feel no discomfort during the polyp removal. Removal of colon polyps is important in preventing colorectal cancer.

 

What are the indications for a colonoscopy?

  • Change of bowel habits
  • Blood in your stool
  • Abdominal pain
  • Weight loss
  • Anemia
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Family history of colon cancer
  • Personal history of colon polyps or breast cancer
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Other symptoms that may be related to gastrointestinal disturbances

What preparation is necessary before a colonoscopy?
Your colon must be clean in order for your physician to get the best view possible. A special diet followed by a laxative preparation is necessary to clear out any waste or solid residue. The instructions must be followed exactly. Any solid material retained in the colon may prolong the procedure or make it necessary to repeat the examination at another time

Will the procedure hurt?
Your physician will give you an intravenous medication to make you feel relaxed. Some people fall asleep and do not remember the procedure when they wake up. The physician will put air into your colon to help visualize the lining, and this sometimes causes a cramping or bloated sensation. Passing this air during and following the exam will relieve any discomfort.

What can I expect when I arrive at the Endoscopy Center?
When you arrive at the Endoscopy Center, you will be asked to change into a gown. The nurse will ask you questions about your medical history and current medication use. Updating this information will make the procedure safe for you. Please be prepared to review your health history at this time. Bring a list of medications and drug allergies, if necessary. Your blood pressure, pulse rate and oxygen saturation will be monitored before, during and after the exam. An intravenous (IV) needle will be placed in your hand or arm.

What can I expect during the colonoscopy?
The nurse will help you get comfortable on a stretcher. After blood pressure and heart rate monitors are applied, you will lie on your left side. Your physician will give you an intravenous injection of medication. After you become relaxed, the physician will insert the tip of the scope into your rectum and advance it forward into the colon. The procedure takes 20-45 minutes. When your exam is finished, you will be taken to the recovery room for observation.

The sedation used during your exam impairs judgment, memory and equilibrium. We cannot perform this procedure unless we know that you will arrive home safely, so please bring a friend or family member with you. Here are some other things to expect:

  • Do not drive, operate machinery, make critical decisions, drink alcoholic beverages or do activities that require coordination or balance for 24 hours.
  • Because air was put into your colon during the procedure, you may experience cramping, bloating and expelling large amounts of air from your rectum.  This is normal for the first 24 hours.
  • You may not have a bowel movement for 1-3 days because of the colonoscopy prep.  This is also normal.

 

Except for these restrictions, you may resume your normal diet unless directed otherwise by your physician. Your physician may give you additional instructions at the time of discharge.

What are the possible complications of colonoscopy?
Please be aware that a colonoscopy is never 100% accurate. The accuracy varies with the quality of the prep and the size of the polyp.  After the procedure, if you develop any new or recurrent gastrointestinal signs or symptoms, immediately bring it to the attention of your physician.

When performed by a knowledgeable and competent physician, a colonoscopy is a very low-risk procedure. Very rarely, bleeding or perforation (tearing of the lining of the colon) may occur. Other risks include a reaction to medication, irritation at the site of the injection, or complications related to other medical problems that you may already have. 

  • Perforation: Passage of the instrument may result in an injury to the gastrointestinal tract wall with possible leakage of gastrointestinal contents into the body cavity.  If this occurs, surgery to close the leak and/or drain the region is usually required.
  • Bleeding: Bleeding, if it occurs, is usually a complication of biopsy, polypectomy or dilation.  Management of this complication may consist only of careful observation, may require transfusions, or possibly a surgical operation.
  • Medication phlebitis:  Medications used for sedation may irritate the vein in which they are injected. This causes a red, painful swelling of the vein and surrounding tissue. The area could become infected. Discomfort in the area may persist for several weeks to several months.
  • Conscious sedation medication and pregnancy:  There are risks involved with anesthesia, especially as it relates to pregnancy.  If there is a question that pregnancy is possible, a urine pregnancy test will be performed prior to the procedure.  If you are breast feeding, do not breast feed for 48 hours.
  • Other risks:  Drug reactions and complications from other diseases you may already have could also be a factor with possible complications.  Instrument failure and death are extremely rare but remain remote possibilities.
  • YOU MUST INFORM YOUR PHYSICIAN OF ALL YOUR ALLERGIC TENDENCIES AND MEDICAL PROBLEMS.

 

Although complications after colonoscopy are uncommon, it is important for you to recognize early signs of any possible complication. Go directly to the emergency department and contact your physician if you notice any of the following:

  • Chills and/or fever over 101 degrees
  • Persistent vomiting
  • Severe abdominal pain, other than gas cramps
  • Severe chest pain
  • Black, tarry stools
  • Any bleeding, exceeding one tablespoon

 

What are the alternatives to gastrointestinal endoscopy?
Although gastrointestinal endoscopy is an extremely safe and effective means of examining the gastrointestinal tract, it is not 100 percent accurate in diagnosis.  In a small percentage of cases, a failure of diagnosis or misdiagnosis may result. Other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures, such as medical treatment, X-ray and surgery are available.  Another option is to choose no diagnostic studies and/or treatment.  Your physician will be happy to discuss these options with you.

 

Additional Tips to Prepare for Colonoscopy

  • It is important to avoid aspirin and NSAIDS (Advil, Ibuprofen, etc.) seven days before the procedure unless instructed differently by your physician. Tylenol can be taken.
  • If you are on blood thinners (anticoagulants: Coumadin, Heparin and/or Lovenox), talk to your physician about discontinuing use prior to the procedure.  If you are on Plavix or ASA (aspirin), talk to your physician about if and/or when it should be discontinued prior to the procedure.
  • Discontinue St. John’s Wort and iron five days before the procedure.
  • Discuss your diabetic medications with your physician. You should not take diuretics the day of the test.
  • Dehydration can occur with the preparation, and therefore it is important to drink plenty of fluids the day before.
  • Do not drink alcohol the day/night of the procedure. 
  • It is important to limit jewelry to a wedding ring only.
  • If a polyp is removed, the physician will instruct you on any precautions concerning medications at discharge.
  • The physician’s office will call within 14 days with your pathology results.  If you haven’t heard from the physician’s office, please contact the office.
  • A normal diet can be resumed the same day unless otherwise instructed.
  • Any bleeding or pain should be reported to your physician.

Other Questions?

If you have any questions, please contact your physician, and he/she will be happy to answer any questions that you may have.

 

Sigmoidoscopy FAQ

Flexible Sigmoidoscopy FAQ

A flexible sigmoidoscopy, also known as a 'flex sig', is a procedure that allows the physician to visually exam a small portion of a patient's large intestine known as the sigmoid colon. The physician will use an instrument called a colonoscope, a small diameter, flexible, lighted fiberoptic or video endoscope, for this brief procedure. This scope is inserted through the anus and is advanced approximately one to two feet into the sigmoid colon, allowing the physician to visualize and capture pictures of any areas of concern. The colonoscope also has open channels that allow the physician to advance other instruments that may be needed to remove lesions, polyps and take biopsies to aid in the diagnosis of any suspicious looking area. If the findings of the flex sig warrant further investigation, then a colonoscopy may be scheduled for further evaluation. A flex sig is usually performed as an outpatient exam and lasts from 5 to 15 minutes and requires no sedation.

Equipment
The flexible endoscope is a remarkable piece of equipment that can be directed and moved around the bends in the lower colon and rectum. The image in the bowel is transmitted through the endoscope either to the eyepiece or a video screen. An open channel in the scope allows other instruments to be passed through it to take tissue samples (biopsies) or to remove polyps.

Reasons for the exam
Sigmoidoscopy is performed to diagnose the cause of certain symptoms. It is also used as a preventative measure to detect problems at an early stage, even before the patient recognizes symptoms. The following are some reasons for performing a sigmoidoscopy:

  • Bleeding - Rectal bleeding is very common. It is often caused by hemorrhoids or by a small tear at the anus, called a fissure. However, more serious problems can cause bleeding. Benign polyps can bleed. It is important to identify and remove polyps at an early stage before they can become cancerous. Rectal and colon cancers bleed and require immediate diagnosis and treatment. Finally, various forms of colitis and inflammation can cause bleeding. 
  • Diarrhea - Persistent diarrhea should always be evaluated. There are many causes of diarrhea, and the exam is of great help in tracking down the specific cause.
  • Pain - Hemorrhoids and fissures are some causes of pain around the anus or in the rectum. Discomfort in the lower abdomen can be caused by tumors. Diverticulosis can occur in the lower bowel. With this condition, small pockets or sacks project from the bowel.
  • X-ray findings - A barium enema X-ray exam may show abnormalities that need to be confirmed or treated by sigmoidoscopy.
  • Detection - Colon cancer is one of the most common cancers in the country. It is highly curable if it is found early. This cancer usually begins in the colon as a polyp that remains benign for many years. Therefore, it is generally advisable to have a sigmoidoscopy after age 40 or 50. If parents, brothers or sisters have had colon polyps or colon cancer, it is even more critical to have this exam. The tendency to develop colon cancer and polyps can be inherited.

Preparation
A patient having a flex sig needs to be clean from stool which is achieved by the patient being on a CLEAR LIQUID DIET the day before the procedure beginning with breakfast. Your physician may prescribe additional preps to assist with the cleansing of the colon. Please see your physician for further instructions regarding the use of regular medications the day before and the day of your procedure. Because this procedure does not usually require sedation, it is not necessary to have someone drive you to and from the center.

Procedure
Flexible sigmoidoscopy is usually performed on an outpatient basis. It is performed with a patient lying on the left side with the legs drawn up. A sheet is placed over the lower body. A finger or digital exam of the anus and rectum is performed. Then the endoscope is gently inserted into the rectum. Air is inflated into the bowel to expand it and allow for careful examination. The patient usually feels a slight discomfort similar to strong gas cramps. The endoscope is then advanced under direct vision and moved around the various bends in the lower bowel.

It is advanced as far as possible without causing undue discomfort. When possible, the exam is continued to 25 inches (60 cm). Certain conditions, such as diverticulosis, irritable bowel syndrome or prior pelvic surgery, may produce discomfort when the sigmoid colon is entered by the endoscope. The exam is stopped if this occurs. The exam usually takes 5 to 15 minutes. Sedation is not normally required.

Benefits
The benefits of sigmoidoscopy can include the following:

  • It is often possible to determine the specific cause of symptoms.
  • Conditions such as colitis and diverticulosis can be monitored to determine effectiveness of treatment.
  • Polyps and tumors can be discovered at an early stage.

 

Alternatives
Alternative testing includes barium enema X-ray exams. Additionally, the stools can be examined in a variety of ways to uncover or study certain bowel conditions. However, a direct look at the lower rectum and the lower bowel by sigmoidoscopy is by far the best method of examining this area.

Side effects and risks
Bloating and bowel distension are common due to the air inflated into the bowel. This usually lasts only 30 to 60 minutes. If biopsies are done or a polyp is removed, there may be some spotting of blood. However, this is rarely serious. Other uncommon risks include a diagnostic error or oversight, or a tear (perforation) of the wall of the colon which might require surgery.

When to expect results
The physician performing the procedure will speak with you and a family member or person(s) that has been given written permission for disclosure of your results. Following the exam in the recovery room, the physician will give you the results of the exam and advise you on further treatment or follow up should any be necessary. In the event that the physician removed a polyp or a biopsy(s) was taken, then you will be advised on when you can expect to receive these results. A pathologist will review the biopsy, and the results are usually available in 10 days.

Summary
Sigmoidoscopy is a simple outpatient exam which can uncover a serious medical problem. Specific diagnoses can be made. Treatment programs can be evaluated, or reassurance can be provided when the exam is normal. It is one of the most useful and simple exams in medicine.

 

Upper Endoscopy FAQ

Upper Endoscopy FAQ

Introduction
Upper endoscopy (also known as gastroscopy, EGD or esophagogastroduodenoscopy) is a procedure that enables your doctor to examine the lining of the esophagus (swallowing tube), stomach and duodenum (first portion of the small intestine). A flexible, lighted tube about the thickness of your little finger is placed through your mouth and into the stomach and duodenum.

Why do an upper endoscopy?
Upper endoscopy is performed to evaluate symptoms of persistent upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, difficulty swallowing or heartburn. It is an excellent method for finding the cause of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. It is more accurate than X-rays for detecting inflammation, ulcers or tumors of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. Upper endoscopy can detect early cancer and can distinguish between cancerous and non-cancerous conditions by performing biopsies of suspicious areas. These are then sent to the laboratory to be analyzed. A biopsy is taken for many reasons and does not mean that cancer is suspected.

 

What are the indications for an upper endoscopy?

  • Anemia
  • Abdominal pain
  • Bloating
  • Belching
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Heartburn
  • Acid reflux
  • Difficult or painful swallowing
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Other symptoms that may be related to gastrointestinal disturbances

 

What preparation is required?
The stomach should be completely empty. You should have nothing to eat or drink after midnight prior to the day before the examination. Your doctor will be more specific about the time to begin fasting depending on the time of day that your test is scheduled.

Medication may need to be adjusted or avoided. It is therefore best to inform your doctor of ALL your current medications as well as allergies to medications a few days prior to the examination. Also, if you have a medical condition, such as heart or lung disease that may require special attention during the procedure, discuss this with your doctor.

You will most likely be sedated during the procedure, and arrangements to have someone accompany you home afterward is imperative. Sedatives will affect your judgment and reflexes for the rest of the day. You should not drive or operate machinery until the next day.

Will the procedure hurt?
Your physician, under the supervision of an anesthesiologist, will give you an intravenous medication to make you feel relaxed. Some people fall asleep and do not remember the procedure when they wake up. The physician will put air into your stomach to help visualize the lining, and this sometimes causes a cramping or bloated sensation.

What can I expect when I arrive at the Endoscopy Center?
When you arrive at the Endoscopy Center, you will be asked to change into a gown. The nurse will ask you questions about your medical history and current medication use. Updating this information will make the procedure safe for you. Please be prepared to review your health history at this time. Bring a list of medications and drug allergies, if necessary. Your blood pressure, pulse rate and oxygen saturation will be monitored before, during and after the exam. An intravenous (IV) needle will be placed in your hand or arm.

What can be expected during an upper endoscopy?
You may have your throat sprayed with a local anesthetic before the test begins, and you will be given medication through a vein to help you relax during the examination. You will lie on your side in a comfortable position as the endoscope is gently passed through your mouth and into your esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The procedure usually lasts 15-20 minutes. The endoscope does not interfere with your breathing. Most patients fall asleep during the procedure. A few find it only slightly uncomfortable.

What happens after an upper endoscopy?
You will be monitored in the recovery area for about 20-30 minutes until the effects of the sedatives have worn off. Your throat may be a little sore for a day or two. You may feel bloated immediately after the procedure because of the air that is introduced into your stomach during the examination. You will be able to resume your diet and take your routine medication after you leave the Endoscopy Center, unless otherwise instructed. Your doctor will usually inform you of your test results on the day of the procedure, unless biopsy samples were taken. These results take about five days to return.

The sedation used during your exam impairs judgment, memory and equilibrium.  We cannot perform this procedure unless we know that you will arrive home safely, so please bring a friend or family member with you. Here are some other things to consider:

  • Do not drive, operate machinery, make critical decisions, drink alcoholic beverages or do activities that require coordination or balance for 24 hours.
  • If given medication for pain, take it as instructed so your pain is not overwhelming.
  • You may experience a sore throat for 24 to 48 hours. You may use throat lozenges or gargle with warm water to relieve the discomfort.
  • Because air was put into your stomach during the procedure, you may experience some belching.

 

What complications can occur?
Gastroscopy and biopsy are very safe when performed by doctors who have had special training and are experienced in these endoscopic procedures. Complications are rare. However, they can occur and include bleeding from the site of a biopsy or polypectomy and a tear (perforation) through the lining of the intestinal wall. Blood transfusions are rarely required. A reaction to the sedatives can occur. Irritation to the vein that medications were given is uncommon, but may cause a tender lump lasting a few weeks. Warm, moist towels will help relieve this discomfort.

When performed by a knowledgeable and competent physician, an upper endoscopy (EGD) is a very low-risk procedure. Very rarely, bleeding or perforation (tearing) may occur. Other risks include a reaction to medication, irritation at the site of the injection, or complications related to other medical problems that you may already have.

  • Perforation:  Passage of the instrument may result in an injury to the gastrointestinal tract wall with possible leakage of gastrointestinal contents into the body cavity.  If this occurs, surgery to close the leak and/or drain the region is usually required.
  • Bleeding:  Bleeding, if it occurs, is usually a complication of biopsy, polypectomy or dilation.  Management of this complication may consist only of careful observation, or may require transfusions or possibly a surgical operation.
  • Medication phlebitis:  Medications used for sedation may irritate the vein in which they are injected.  This causes a red, painful swelling of the vein and surrounding tissue.  The area could become infected.  Discomfort in the area may persist for several weeks to several months.
  • Conscious sedation medication and pregnancy:  There are risks involved with anesthesia, especially as it relates to pregnancy.  If there is a question that pregnancy is possible, a urine pregnancy test will be performed prior to the procedure.  If you are breast feeding, do not breast feed for 48 hours.
  • Other Risks: Drug reactions and complications from other diseases you may already have can also be a factor in complications.  Instrument failure and death are extremely rare but remain remote possibilities.
  • YOU MUST INFORM YOUR PHYSICIAN OF ALL YOUR ALLERGIC TENDENCIES AND MEDICAL PROBLEMS.

 

Although complications after upper endoscopy (EGD) are uncommon, it is important for you to recognize early signs of any possible complication. Go directly to the emergency room and contact your physician if you notice any of the following:

  • Chills and/or fever over 101
  • Persistent vomiting or vomiting with blood/nasal regurgitation
  • Severe abdominal pain, other than gas cramps
  • Severe chest pain
  • Black, tarry stools

Please be informed that an EGD is never 100% accurate.  After the procedure, if you should develop any new or recurrent gastrointestinal signs or symptoms, immediately bring it to the attention of your physician.

What are the alternatives to gastrointestinal endoscopy?
Although gastrointestinal endoscopy is an extremely safe and effective means of examining the gastrointestinal tract, it is not 100 percent accurate in diagnosis.  In a small percentage of cases, a failure of diagnosis or misdiagnosis may result.  Other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures, such as medical treatment, X-ray and surgery are available.  Another option is to choose no diagnostic studies and/or treatment.  Your physician will be happy to discuss these options with you.

Additional Tips to Prepare for Upper Endoscopy
  • In order for you to have a complete exam, you should have no food or drink after 11 p.m. the night before your procedure.
  • If you take Coumadin/Heparin/Aspirin or NSAIDS (Advil, Ibuprofen, etc.), your physician will discuss with you if you should stop these prior to the procedure.
  • If you are on blood thinners (anticoagulants: Coumadin, Heparin and/or Lovenox), talk to your physician about discontinuing use prior to the procedure. If you are on Plavix or ASA (aspirin), talk to your physician about if and/or when it should be discontinued prior to the procedure.
  • You can take your other medications except as instructed by your physician with one exception: Review your diabetic medications with your physician.
  • Jewelry should be kept to a minimum. Only a wedding ring should be worn.

 

Other questions?
If you have any questions please contact your physician and he/she will be happy to answer any questions that you may have.