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If you suspect you have it

Discover when you need to quarantine yourself, see a doctor, and get tested. Also learn what happens after you test positive.

I might have it

Yes, stay home when you are sick. Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
See the CDC quick tip sheet. Call our 24/7 Nurse Line for help in understanding your condition. In the Pittsburgh or Erie area call (412) NURSE-4-U.
Anyone who thinks they may have been exposed to COVID-19, or if you are experiencing fever, cough, or shortness of breath, should contact his or her primary care physician or health care provider immediately.
Contact your primary care provider. He or she will complete a travel and exposure screening to help best determine if further testing is required.
Limit contact with pets & animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus.
Yes, wearing cloth face masks helps slow the spread of the Coronavirus by protecting people from those who may be infected but don’t have symptoms.
Try to isolate the infected person as much as possible from other household members and pets--have the person stay away from other people and use a separate bedroom and bathroom if available.

Where do I go?

In case of emergency contact 911. It is recommended to call the ER or Urgent care facility so they can prepare for your arrival. Mild cases of COVID-19 are often treated symptomatically from home or through outpatient services instead of a visit to an acute care facility.

Contact your doctor, health care provider, or local county health department. They will use CDC guidelines to determine if testing is warranted. There are a few ways that a lab may get a sample for testing.

Swab test. A health care provider will use a special swab to take a sample from your nose or throat.

Nasal aspirate. A health care provider will inject a saline solution into your nose, then remove the sample with gentle suction.

Tracheal aspirate. A health care provider will put a thin, lighted tube called a bronchoscope down your mouth and into your lungs, where a sample will be collected.

Sputum test. Sputum is a thick mucus that is coughed up from the lungs. You may be asked to cough up sputum into a special cup, or a special swab may be used to take a sample from your nose.

Blood. A health care professional will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm.

Contact your primary care physician for testing options. Testing is completed at the State Department of Health (DOH) and will be brought into facilities once tests are available. Test results are made available within 24 hours of the State DOH receiving the test kit.
Your primary care physician will be able to help you. If you don’t have one, visit Find a Doctor for help in finding a doctor near you
Contact your primary care physician. He or she will complete a travel and exposure screening to help best determine if further testing is required.
No, home testing for COVID-19 is not available at this time.
Yes, people who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate and treat their symptom at home during their illness. There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19.
  1. In case of medical emergency, call 911. That means difficulty breathing or another emergency medical condition.
  2. Call your doctor's office or the emergency department before visiting so they can prepare for your arrival.
  3. Video visits or telemedicine are great ways to avoid leaving home when you are ill and still receive medical assistance. Just log into MyChart and select Video Visit.
Video visits are also available 24/7 with MyChart. This is a great way to avoid leaving home when you are ill and still receive medical assistance. Just log in and select Video Visit.
Contact their doctor about what type of visit is best for them; video visits are the safest path to medical advice because they let those who are sick stay at home and avoid contact with crowds.

I do have it

There is no antiviral treatment for COVID-19. People diagnosed with COVID-19 will be provided with care to help relieve symptoms.
Talk to your health care provider: The decision to discontinue home isolation precautions should be made on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with health care providers and state and local health departments.
Your primary care physician will be able to help you. If you don’t have a doctor, visit your member website or call Member Services at the number on the back of your insurance card to identify an in-network doctor.
Your primary care physician will be able to help you. If you don't have one, visit Find a Doctor for help in finding a doctor near you.
Researchers are working on developing a vaccine for this virus. It is estimated to take between 6 and 18 months.
We do not know if there are any long-term negative effects. We will learn more as more people are in recovered status.
This depends on the person's health condition. People without chronic health conditions are showing a recovery time frame of 7-14 days.

Basics and tips

We learn more about COVID-19 every day including how the virus spreads, who’s more susceptible, and how you can avoid catching it.

Care for other conditions

If you are pregnant or have a chronic condition, you probably have a lot of questions on how COVID-19 affects your ongoing care.

Do you know where to go?

It’s that moment – you think you have COVID-19. At AHN, we’re ready to help you. Learn where you can get the care you need now.

What’s changed at AHN?

AHN has taken a number of proactive steps to protect our patients and caregivers, and to prevent potential transmission of the virus.