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Pregnancy Journey Guide

Families come in all shapes and sizes. And new additions
to a family can be an exciting but unsure time. 

(412) DOCTORS

AHN Women supports your family

We help moms, babies and their support systems with information on staying healthy and happy. Caring for you in every trimester, including the fourth, is #LivingProof.

Know what happens to you and your baby

  • Month 1


    Mom: Mood changes; may feel anxious or worried.

    Baby: Nerve cells are forming through the embryo.

    Tip: Eliminate or minimize caffeine consumption. Experts say between 150 to 300 mg should be the daily maximum.

  • Month 2


    Mom: Increased blood volume.

    Baby: Heart beats with regular rhythm.

    Tip: 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity each day is sufficient. Break it up into smaller increments, if necessary (e.g., 10 minutes, three times a day).

  • Month 3


    Mom: Hair and nails should grow nicely.

    Baby: Fetus may start growing hair.

    Tip: Avoid nail polish and hair dyes that may contain harmful chemicals such as toluene, formaldehyde, and quaternium-15.

  • Month 4


    Mom: Nausea is resolving and appetite will increase.

    Baby: Placenta is fully formed.

    Tip: Know what foods to eat and which ones to avoid.

  • Month 5


    Mom: Heart beats faster.

    Baby: Active and turns.

    Tip: Try prenatal yoga that can include asana (physical postures), pranayama (breath work), meditation, and relaxation. Or, try meditation and relaxation on your own. Always check with your doctor before doing a new activity.

  • Month 6


    Mom: May feel anxious and excited at the same time.

    Baby: Eyes will soon open and fingerprints are forming.

    Tip: Get your family ready and prepared for your new addition.

  • Month 7


    Mom: May have trouble sleeping due to baby’s movements.

    Baby: Kicks, stretches, and responds to sound, baby may begin to recognize mom and partner’s voices.

    Tip: Consider planning for “ Rooming In ”.

  • Month 8


    Mom: Immunity transfers to baby to protect them at birth.

    Baby: Skull remains soft and flexible for the birth.

    Tip: Make your house safe and sanitary for when the baby comes home.

  • Month 9


    Mom: Cervix starts to open and dilate, preparing for birth.

    Baby: Vernix, a greasy, white material, coats the baby’s skin to prepare for delivery.

    Tip: Pack for mom and baby’s hospital stay.

  • Month 10


    Mom: Breasts feel enlarged as milk comes in.

    Baby: Infant hunger cues include: awakening, soft sounds, mouthing (clicks, sticking out tongue), hand-to-mouth activity, and increased crying.

    Tip: Snack when your baby snacks. Include nutrients especially important to this trimester: protein, calcium, and iron.

  • Month 11


    Mom: This is the time for your OB/GYN check in to: evaluate you for postpartum, give a physical, discuss contraceptive options, and talk about breastfeeding.

    Baby: Even small changes in eating, sleeping and/or crying can be signs of issues in newborns.

    Tip: Know the symptoms of illness or complications with your newborn.

  • Month 12


    Mom: Sleep may be sparse, but it’s important.

    Baby: Pacifiers can reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Symptom (SIDS).

    Tip: Sleep when your baby sleeps and know about the importance of sleep.

Know what happens to you and your baby

1st Trimester

2nd Trimester

3rd Trimester

4th Trimester

Month 1


Mom: Mood changes; may feel anxious or worried.

Baby: Nerve cells are forming through the embryo.

Tip: Eliminate or minimize caffeine consumption. Experts say between 150 to 300 mg should be the daily maximum.

Month 2


Mom: Increased blood volume.

Baby: Heart beats with regular rhythm.

Tip: 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity each day is sufficient. Break it up into smaller increments, if necessary (e.g., 10 minutes, three times a day).

Month 3


Mom: Hair and nails should grow nicely.

Baby: Fetus may start growing hair.

Tip: Avoid nail polish and hair dyes that may contain harmful chemicals such as toluene, formaldehyde, and quaternium-15.

Month 4


Mom: Nausea is resolving and appetite will increase.

Baby: Placenta is fully formed.

Tip: Know what foods to eat and which ones to avoid.

Month 5


Mom: Heart beats faster.

Baby: Active and turns.

Tip: Try prenatal yoga that can include asana (physical postures), pranayama (breath work), meditation, and relaxation. Or, try meditation and relaxation on your own. Always check with your doctor before doing a new activity.

Month 6


Mom: May feel anxious and excited at the same time.

Baby: Eyes will soon open and fingerprints are forming.

Tip: Get your family ready and prepared for your new addition.

Month 7


Mom: May have trouble sleeping due to baby’s movements.

Baby: Kicks, stretches, and responds to sound, baby may begin to recognize mom and partner’s voices.

Tip: Consider planning for “ Rooming In ”.

Month 8


Mom: Immunity transfers to baby to protect them at birth.

Baby: Skull remains soft and flexible for the birth.

Tip: Make your house safe and sanitary for when the baby comes home.

Month 9


Mom: Cervix starts to open and dilate, preparing for birth.

Baby: Vernix, a greasy, white material, coats the baby’s skin to prepare for delivery.

Tip: Pack for mom and baby’s hospital stay.

Month 10


Mom: Breasts feel enlarged as milk comes in.

Baby: Infant hunger cues include: awakening, soft sounds, mouthing (clicks, sticking out tongue), hand-to-mouth activity, and increased crying.

Tip: Snack when your baby snacks. Include nutrients especially important to this trimester: protein, calcium, and iron.

Month 11


Mom: This is the time for your OB/GYN check in to: evaluate you for postpartum, give a physical, discuss contraceptive options, and talk about breastfeeding.

Baby: Even small changes in eating, sleeping and/or crying can be signs of issues in newborns.

Tip: Know the symptoms of illness or complications with your newborn.

Month 12


Mom: Sleep may be sparse, but it’s important.

Baby: Pacifiers can reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Symptom (SIDS).

Tip: Sleep when your baby sleeps and know about the importance of sleep.


For Anyone Expecting a Little One

  • Read the AHN Trimester Book


     

    Want to learn more about pregnancy? Read the book to enhance your understanding of the 1st through 4th trimesters.

  • Postpartum Depression


     

    Postpartum depression is more persistent and lasts longer than the baby blues. It’s also more common than people think.

  • Read the AHN 4th Trimester Book


    Want to learn more about what to expect in the 4th trimester? Download the book or access the interactive resource.

Alexis Joy D’Achille Center for Perinatal Mental Health

The Alexis Joy D’Achille Center for Perinatal Mental Health offers a mother-baby intensive outpatient program for women during or after pregnancy. We have the best-in-class screening tools to check for perinatal mood disorders. 

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